30 Words For Things You Do Every Day But Never Knew Had a Name

Read them all, and don't absquatulate!

30 Words For Things You Do Every Day But Never Knew Had a Name
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Most of the time, it's not too much of a challenge to describe the things we do everyday. We eat. We sleep. We talk. But what about stretching your arms after you wake up, or that sound of your stomach rumbling at lunchtime? Did you know there are single words for those everyday occurrences as well? Get ready to sound a whole lot smarter, because we've rounded up 30 words for things you do every day that you never knew had a name.

1
Boondoggle

man fidgeting in front of a laptop, things you do that you didn't know had words
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We've all been guilty of boondoggling—probably more than we'd like to admit. It's the act of doing work that has little to no value just for the sake of looking busy. And trust us, your boss knows.

2
Griffonage

writing Life Easier
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Make sure you take it slow when you jot down your grocery list. Because if you don't, your griffonage, or illegible handwriting, could lead to you buying Cheerios when you really needed cheese.

3
Mondegreen

microphone bad jokes
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If you're one of the millions of people who thought 'NSYNC's hit song was a springtime tune called "It's Gonna Be May" (instead of the actual title, "It's Gonna Be Me), you can call that mondegreen, which is what happens when you mishear a lyric that changes the meaning of a song.

4
Wamble

Man Holding His Stomach Out of Hunger Commonly Misused Phrases
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That rumbling feeling in your stomach when you're hungry? That's wambling, and it means you need to take your lunch break ASAP.

5
Eggcorn

confused older woman, every day words
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Have you ever said "biting my time" instead of "biding my time"? That's an eggcorn, which is when you mistakenly use a word or phrase because it sounds similar to the one you meant to use.

6
Phosphenes

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If you rub your eyes too hard, you might start seeing phosephenes. Those are the bright spots you see when you close your eyes and put pressure on them.

7
Apricity

woman soaking in sun in the winter as she lacks vitamin D
Alamy

That magical moment when you feel the warm sun on your face on a cold day? That's apricity, a name for the heat from the sun in winter.

8
Acnestis

woman trying to scratch her back between shoulders, everyday words
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The acnestis is the part of your back that you just can't reach, although we'd bet that you try and scratch it at least a few times a day.

9
Zarf

coffee cup with a lid
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Grabbing your morning coffee? Make sure you grab a zarf so you don't burn your hands! That's the cardboard holder you put around your coffee so you can hold it.

10
Accubation

Asian man sits up in bed late at night with plate of noodles, things you didn't know there were words for
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We're sure you were told multiple times not to do this while you were growing up. In British English, accubation is the act of eating or drinking while lying down.

11
Akrasia

woman confused and thinking, weighing two choices, every day words
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Your bad habits have a name: akrasia, or the act of doing something contrary to what you know is best. For example, a good example of akrasia would be going on a shopping spree at Target when you know you don't have the extra cash.

12
Power cycling

person turning off tv
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Electronic devise not working? Well, have you tried turning it off then turning it back on? That's called power cycling.

13
Tinnitus

older man with hairy ear, things you didn't know there were words for
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Got that ringing in your ears? No, you're not going crazy. It's called tinnitus and many people experience it—with a large amount of people believing the sound is in E flat.

14
Paresthesia

girl laying in bed with her legs out, every day words
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A similarly annoying occurrence is the tingling you feel when your leg falls asleep. This is called paresthesia, i.e. the "pins and needles" feeling that can occur in any part of the body.

15
Dysania

woman lying sick in bed with serious cold symptoms a headache and a fever
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If you're finding it hard to get out of bed in the morning, you're experiencing dysania. While it's not formally recognized, some people consider it to be an actual medical condition, according to WebMD.

16
Collywobbles

Man Holding His Stomach in Pain, health questions after 40
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You know that feeling you get before you speak in front of a large crowd? Or before you talk to a person you're interested in? Those butterflies are technically called collywobbles.

17
Pogonotrophy

young shirtless man looking in mirror, make yourself more attractive
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Men are usually the ones practicing pogonothrophy (especially during No Shave November)—it's the act of growing out facial hair.

18
Pandiculation

morning people
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Pandiculation is the act of stretching out those stiffened muscles, usually when you're tired or first waking up.

19
Defenstrate

windowsill, new windows, increase home value
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Defenstrate is the act of throwing something or someone out of a window—both of which you should probably avoid.

20
Prink

man looking at his clothes in the mirror
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That small fuss you make over the way you're dressed right before you leave the house? It's called prinking—and don't worry, you probably look great!

21
Tmesis

woman thinking, every day words
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Aren't these words just fan-freaking-tastic?! Well, that brings us to the word tmesis. It's when you separate one word into two by inserting another word for emphasis.

22
Absquatulate

man walking away, every day words
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Stuck at a party you don't want to be at? Just absquatulate, which means to leave abruptly.

23
Accismus

women look at food at party offered by male host, things you didn't know there were words for
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If someone reluctantly offers you some of their food because they saw you eyeing it, that's a classic example of accismus. It's the irony in which someone pretends to be disinterested in something they actually want.

24
Ambedo

little girl looking at rain on the window, every day words
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The word ambedo, which has Latin roots, is described as the "melancholy trance you experience when you become completely absorbed in vivid sensory details," like when you're listening to the raindrops on a window or watching snow fall in front of a streetlamp.

25
Boketto

Young black man with shaved head leans against brick wall and stares into distance, things you didn't know had words
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Meanwhile, the act of absent-mindedly staring without focusing on your thoughts has a Japanese term: boketto. It's similar to daydreaming, except it involves not thinking at all. Sounds kind of nice, doesn't it?

26
Kummerspeck

sad woman eating ice cream in bed, every day words
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That excess weight you gain from emotional over-eating is called kummerspeck in German. It literally translates to grief bacon.

27
Scurryfunge

Man Cleaning Home Romance
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That last-minute, panicked cleaning session you engage in right before guests come over is called scurryfunge.

28
Tartle

two coworkers talking outside, every day words
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Have you ever had that dreaded moment where you go to address someone and completely blank on their name? The term for that act of hesitation is tartle, which is actually a Scottish word.

29
Mamihlapinatapai

older friends talking over coffee
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If you exchange a look with someone who you know feels the same way as you, it's called mamihlapinatapai. The word is from the endangered Yámana language, but according to linguist Thomas Bridges, it basically describes a look shared between two people.

30
Anecdoche

group of friends laughing, aging quicker
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Anecdoche is a group conversation in which everyone is talking just to one-up each other, but no one is really listening. For instance, when someone just has to tell you about the time they broke their leg after you explained how you had been experiencing an odd leg pain. And for more words to add to your ever-expanding vocabulary, check out these 30 Useful Yiddish Words Anyone Can Use.

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Kali Coleman
Kali is an assistant editor at Best Life. Read more
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