25 Weird British Foods Meghan Markle Needs to Know About

Will the "foodie" from California indulge in jellied eels or spotted dick?

25 Weird British Foods Meghan Markle Needs to Know About

Will the "foodie" from California indulge in jellied eels or spotted dick?

circle

Britain is known for a lot of things, but great food isn’t one of them. For a California girl and self-described foodie like Meghan Markle, national delicacies like “spotted dick” and “toad in the hole” could be pretty tough to stomach. (No wonder Kate Middleton is so thin.) Here’s the rundown on some of the weirdest and oddly named foods Meghan is likely to come across as she embarks on her six-month-long “getting to know you” tour around the country with Prince Harry. (Don’t forget your Tums!) And for more great coverage of the royal family, here 9 Rules Meghan Markle Needs to Know Before Her First Royal Christmas.

weird British foods

1
Haggis

Haggis is made by mixing sheep’s heart, liver, and lungs with oatmeal and onions. The Scottish dish was traditionally cooked in the animal’s stomach, but we’ve been assured that’s no longer the case. These days, it’s made in sausage casing. Fans of the “delicacy” say it tastes like a peppery meatloaf.

weird British foods

2
Offal

Animal organs are used in many classic British dishes, like steak and kidney pudding, which is made with diced beef, lamb’s or pig’s kidneys, and suet (waxy fat of beef or mutton) pastry. Thanks, but we’ll just have a salad.

weird British foods

3
Spotted Dick

The absolutely wretched name notwithstanding, this is a popular dish of sponge pudding made with suet (the Brits love their suet!) and dried fruit, and served with custard. Mummy and Daddy likely ate a lot of this at boarding school.

weird british foods

4
Black pudding

Actually a blood sausage that was born out of the tradition of butchers combining every last scrap of different butchered animals to make food. Despite its humble beginnings, it is a breakfast staple in the UK and Ireland, where it is served with toast. Just the thing if you’re having a family of vampires over for brunch.

weird British foods

5
White pudding

Also a sausage, but is made using pork fat instead of blood.

weird British foods

6
Jellied eels 

A favorite among Londoners, but the dish isn’t very popular outside of the UK. We can’t imagine why.

weird British foods

7
Toad in the hole

Toad in the hole refers to sausages baked into a Yorkshire pudding batter. Brits love it covered in gray.

weird British foods

8
Periwinkles

These are small sea snails also known as “winkles” that are a favorite in the coastal areas of the UK.

weird British foods

9
Stargazy pie

A terrifying looking dish that is made with baked pilchards (a type of fish), eggs, and potatoes as filling. This Cornish “delicacy” gets its name for the way the fish heads are baked into the pie so they are jutting out of the crust so as to ‘gaze’ up at diners. We kid you not.

weird british foods

10
Kedgeree

Kedgeree comes from Kichari, a traditional Indian dish that mixes rice and vegetables. The British version combines smoked fish like mackerel, boiled eggs, peas, and herbs.

weird British foods

11
Marmite

A salty paste made from brewers’ yeast extract that’s usually spread on toast. Brits either love it or hate it. We know what camp we’d join if asked.

weird British food

12
Liquor sauce

This is a sauce made with parsley and vinegar and is the classic accompaniment to pie and mash (meat pie with mashed potatoes), which originated in East London in the 19th century and is still popular today.

weird British foods

13
Kippers 

Smoked fish served with brown bread and a lemon wedge for breakfast. We’ll stick to Cheerios.

weird British foods

14
Bread and dripping

Dripping is the fat from roasting a side of beef or pork and is used as oil in cooking or—yum—served straight up on toast.

weird British foods

15
Mucky dripping

Mucky dripping is gravy made from whatever is left in the roasting pan and can be spread on pretty much anything. A favorite of cardiac surgeons everywhere.

weird British foods

16
Mushy peas

These are peas that have been soaked overnight, then boiled with sugar and salt, to form a green mush. It’s the side dish usually served with fish and chips. One of the only things on this list we’ve actually tried and liked.

weird british foods

17
Potted shrimp

Potted shrimps are brown shrimp soaked in a nutmeg-flavored butter and stored in a glass jar. Usually served on whole wheat toast, they’re popular at some of the UK’s swankiest eateries.

weird British foods

18
Mincemeat pies

Mince pies are made with “mincemeat” (a mix of dried fruit, peel, and suet), and are baked with spices and served as a Christmas dessert. Tastes better than it sounds.

weird British foods

19
Brown sauce

Brown sauce pretty much goes on everything from bacon sandwiches to breakfasts and has for centuries. It is made with malt vinegar, tomatoes, dates, tamarind extract, and spices.

weird british foods

20
Pork pies

Pork pies are made from chopped pork coated in pork jelly (we gagged from just typing that), before being wrapped in a pastry and baked.

weird British foods

21
Laverbread

Laverbread is considered a Welsh delicacy and is made from edible seaweed that has been boiled for several hours before being minced and puréed.

weird British foods

22
Scotch eggs

These are standard pub fare and consist of a hard-boiled egg encased in sausage meat rolled in breadcrumbs and usually deep fried. Otherwise known as a heart attack on a plate.

weird British foods

23
Rumbledethumps

Rumbledethumps sounds like the name of a character in Harry Potter, but it’s actually a casserole made from leftover cabbage with lots of butter slathered in cheese. It’s the Scottish variation on the British favorite, Bubble and Squeak, which is made with fried leftover vegetables.

weird British foods

24
Pease pudding

Pease pudding is made using lentils or split peas that have been boiled and puréed. No one outside of the UK ever eats this. No one.

weird British foods

25
Christmas pudding

A staple of dessert time made from fried fruit, nuts, suet, and lots of brandy that’s often set on fire right before serving. In all honesty, it’s not that bad. Must be all that brandy.

Diane Clehane is a New York-based journalist and author of Imagining Diana A Novel.

To discover more amazing secrets about living your best life, click here to sign up for our FREE daily newsletter!

Best Life
Live smarter, look better,​ and live your life to the absolute fullest.
Get Our Newsletter Every Day!
Enter your email address to get the best tips and advice.
close modal
close modal
GET YOUR FREE GIFT
SUBSCRIBE