Property Brothers Reveal 8 Ways to Boost Your Home's Value

The HGTV personalities open up about the improvements that can make a major difference.

Owning a home is an investment. Even if you have no plans to sell, you never know what the future may hold—whether that's moving across the country for work, or needing more space for a growing family. Whatever the case may be, your home's value could one day be crucial, and even if you hope to stay put, you can make changes now that will make a huge difference on your return on investment (ROI). Not sure where to start? Take some cues from TV's most beloved renovation duo, Drew and Jonathan Scott. Over the years, the twins have talked about the home improvements that will help you big-time if you do decide to put your place up for sale. Read on for eight ways you can boost your home value, according to the Property Brothers.

RELATED: Property Brothers Warn Against 4 Popular Home Trends "You Need to Stop."

1
Revamp your cabinets.

Close up of painting kitchen cabinets white.
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It can cost a pretty penny to renovate an old kitchen, but you don't necessarily have to go big.

"If the layout of your kitchen cabinets is not bad, you can always make it look fresh and new—without spending all the money—by resurfacing the cabinets that are already there," Drew told Architectural Digest in a March 2023 interview.

You can sand your cabinets down, strip off any existing sealant, and then repaint them with an oil-based acrylic paint, according to Architectural Digest.

But "do not use latex paint to refinish cabinets," Drew warned.

RELATED: "Moody" Paint Colors Can Increase Your Home's Value, New Study Says.

2
Upgrade your appliances.

Washing machines, dryer and other domestic appliance equipment in the house
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Brand-new appliances are appealing to buyers as well, but don't choose just any model. The Property Brothers told Architectural Digest that they always advise buying Energy Star models when you're switching things out.

"If you're going to be upgrading anyway, why not get the latest tech and something that will lower your bills?" Drew noted.

3
Swap out your light bulbs.

Power saving concept. man changing compact-fluorescent (CFL) bulbs with new LED light bulb.
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Another easy energy-saving swap you should make to boost your home's value is switching out your old light bulbs for LEDs.

"The average house in America has 40 light bulbs, and if you upgrade to something that's more efficient like LED light bulbs, it's using way less energy," Drew explained to Architectural Digest. "Plus, they last about 25 times longer."

They can also provide more versatility in a home, according to the HGTV personalities.

"If you want to get nerdy, LED lights can come in all different color temperatures," Drew said. "I have a cool light, a warm light, or even for Halloween I change the outside lights. It's all in an app I can control from my phone; it's something that makes my life easy and more fun. And the kids love it too."

RELATED: Joanna Gaines Reveals the 5 Paint Colors She'd Never Use in Her Home.

4
Add more natural light.

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Drew and Jonathan also shared ideas on how to get the "best return on investment" in their 2016 book Dream Home: The Property Brothers' Ultimate Guide to Finding & Fixing Your Perfect House (per Business Insider). In the book, the twins stress the importance of having natural light in your home.

"We've yet to meet a buyer who tells us they want a dark house," they write. "Adding or enlarging windows is generally a safe bet if your home is noticeably dark."

5
Change out your doors.

Modern front house entrance with one car garage
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In their book, the HGTV stars advise homeowners to think about the state of their doors.

"Updating an old manual garage door with new, automatic garage doors adds both curb appeal and functionality to the exterior of your house," they explain.

If you already have an updated garage door, the Property Brothers suggest swapping out back sliding doors for French doors or getting a new front door.

RELATED: I'm a Property Expert and These Are the 5 Things That Devalue Your Home.

6
Invest in more closet storage.

A young woman chooses which bra to wear while standing in front of a neatly arranged wardrobe. The concept of underwear storage and space organization. Top view.
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People should also remember that "storage is everything," especially to potential buyers.

"One thing that so many people forget about when they're selling is how attractive it is to have closet organization systems in your home," Jonathan told Architectural Digest.

You don't even have to get complicated and hire a professional. Instead, Jonathan recommends going to your nearest home improvement store to buy a simple system that you can easily install with a drill.

"If you add some open shelves, drawers, and double racks for storage, you wouldn't believe how much you can get into one small, standard closet," he shared. "The systems look clean, and they're also modernizing your closets."

7
Open up your floor plan.

contractor with architect discussing loft apartment remodel
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It's not just extra storage people are searching for in potential homes: They also want an open floor plan, since having your rooms compartmentalized and boxed in can "cut off the social function of a house," according to the Property Brothers' book.

"The only way to bring a feeling of spaciousness to those homes and make them feel bigger is to open them up," the duo write.

8
Make room for a master bath.

Bathroom in New Luxury Home
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The final thing you may want to consider to boost your home's value is a master bathroom.

"A bath attached to the master bedroom in a house is a pleasant surprise, even for homebuyers who don't put it on their wish list," the Property Brothers explain in their book.

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Kali Coleman
Kali Coleman is a Senior Editor at Best Life. Her primary focus is covering news, where she often keeps readers informed on the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and up-to-date on the latest retail closures. Read more
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