Every Venomous Snake in Your State

Check out a full list of the most dangerous snakes potentially lurking in your backyard.

"Out of sight, out of mind" can be a good strategy to combat our biggest fears. But when it comes to a fear of snakes—despite snake bites being quite rare—it's best to be vigilant about where these slithery reptiles might be lurking. And that requires some knowledge of the dangerous snakes that reside near you. That's why antivenom brand CroFab put together a full list of the types of venomous snakes in each U.S. state. Read on to find out how many of these deadly creatures reside in your state, and which snake-heavy states you'll want to take extra caution in.

RELATED: 17-Year-Old Bitten by Rattlesnake in His Home—Where It Was Hiding.

Alabama

Mountain Brook, Alabama
Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

Copperhead snakes are native to 28 states, along the East Coast (with the exception of New England) and in the Southeast and Midwest.

Alaska

glaciers, lake, and tress in Chugach, Alaska
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Alaska is one of only four states with no native venomous snakes.

Arizona

landscape photo of Phoenix, Arizona at sunset
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  1. Arizona Black Rattlesnake
  2. Black-Tailed Rattlesnake
  3. Grand Canyon Rattlesnake
  4. Massasauga
  5. Mojave Rattlesnake
  6. Prairie Rattlesnake
  7. Ridge-Nosed Rattlesnake
  8. Rock Rattlesnake
  9. Sidewinder
  10. Speckled Rattlesnake
  11. Tiger Rattlesnake
  12. Twin-Spotted Rattlesnake
  13. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Of all U.S. states, Arizona has the highest number of native snake species.

Arkansas

landscape photo of Little Rock, Arkansas at sunset
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  4. Timber Rattlesnake
  5. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Cottonmouth snakes are native to 17 states, mainly in the Southeast and Midwest.

California

Beach in Northern California
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  1. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  2. Mojave Rattlesnake
  3. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
  4. Panamint Rattlesnake
  5. Red Diamond Rattlesnake
  6. Sidewinder
  7. Southern Pacific Rattlesnake
  8. Speckled Rattlesnake
  9. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

California has the third-highest number of native snake species of all the states.

Colorado

Eldorado Springs, Colorado
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  1. Massasauga
  2. Midget Faded Wester Rattlesnake
  3. Mojave Rattlesnake
  4. Prairie Rattlesnake

With the exception of the four states that have no native snake species, all U.S. states have native rattlesnakes.

Connecticut

Old Greenwich, Connecticut
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Delaware

Hockessin, Delaware
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Florida

Florida Keys
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

Georgia

Georgia
Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlensnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

RELATED: Giraffe-Sized Python Found in the U.S.—Why They're Unstoppable.

Hawaii

landscape photo of the coastline of Na Pali Coast and mountain in Kauai, Hawaii
iStock

There are no venomous snakes in Hawaii.

Idaho

the Sawtooth Mountain Range and lake in Stanley, Idaho
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  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

Illinois

landscape photo of flowers and a field in Naperville, Illinois at sunset
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Massasauga
  4. Timber Rattlesnake

Indiana

Landscape photo of Brown County State Park, Indiana
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Massasauga
  4. Timber Rattlesnake

Iowa

waterloo iowa
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Massasauga
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake
  4. Timber Rattlesnake

RELATED: 4 Scents That Attract Snakes to Your Yard, Experts Say.

Kansas

field of wheat in central Kansas is nearly ready for harvest.
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Massasauga
  4. Prairie Rattlesnake
  5. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  6. Timber Rattlesnake

Kentucky

landscape photo of Frankfort, Kentucky at sunrise
Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  4. Timber Rattlesnake

Louisiana

the cameron parish marshes Louisiana
Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

Maine

Fox Den Cove Moosehead Lake
mountinez / iStock

There are no venomous snakes in Maine.

Maryland

the Great Falls of Potomac in Potomac, Maryland
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

RELATED: 8 Things in Your Yard That Are Attracting Snakes to Your Home.

Massachusetts

Waban Lake Park Massachusetts
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Michigan

windmill in holland michigan
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  1. Massasauga

Minnesota

Orange and green trees next to and a bridge over a lake in Duluth, Minnestoa
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  1. Massasauga
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Mississippi

Madison, Mississippi
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

Missouri

pond in a garden with autumn trees in St. Louis, Missouri
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Massasauga
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

Montana

Montana
Shutterstock
  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

Nebraska

national historic park, chimney rock, nebraska
Don Mammoser / Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Massasauga
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake
  4. Timber Rattlesnake

Nevada

Southern Rocky Mountains and flowers in El Paso, Texas at sunrise
iStock
  1. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  2. Panamint Rattlesnake
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake
  4. Sidewinder
  5. Speckled Rattlesnake
  6. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

New Hampshire

Etna New Hampshire
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  1. Timber Rattlesnake

New Jersey

pine barrens in new jersey
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

RELATED: 8 Plants That Will Keep Snakes Out of Your Yard, According to Pest Experts.

New Mexico

The White Cliffs of Gallup in Gallup, New Mexico
Pixel Doc / Shutterstock
  1. Black-Tailed Rattlesnake
  2. Massasauga
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake
  4. Ridge-Nosed Rattlesnake
  5. Rock Rattlesnake
  6. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

New York

field of flowers and tress and a lake in Fort Montgomery, New York
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Massasauga
  3. Timber Rattlesnake

North Carolina

garden filled with flowers and trees in Raleigh, North Carolina
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

North Dakota

a butte and green trees at Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota
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  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

Ohio

A Stone Stairway And Path Through A Forest Glen Helen Nature Preserve Yellow Springs Ohio
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Massasauga
  3. Timber Rattlesnake

Oklahoma

photo of rock formation, the Wedding Party, in the Black Mesa Area, Oklahoma
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Massasauga
  4. Prairie Rattlesnake
  5. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  6. Timber Rattlesnake
  7. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Oregon

glaciers, lake, and tress in Deschutes County, Oregon
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  1. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
  2. Prairie Rattlesnake

Pennsylvania

kinzua bridge in kane pennsylvania destroyed during the 2003 tornado
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Massasauga
  3. Timber Rattlesnake

Rhode Island

flowers and beach in Newport, Rhode Island
Shutterstock

There are no venomous snakes in Rhode Island.

South Carolina

landscape photo of a garden in Charleston, South Carolina
Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Pygmy Rattlesnake

RELATED: A Copperhead Snake Bit a 4-Year-Old Boy—Here's Where It Was Hiding.

South Dakota

buffalo in custer state park, south dakota
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  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

Tennessee

fall trees reflecting on the shoreline of Bay Mountain Lake Park in Kingsport, Tennessee
iStock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  4. Timber Rattlesnake

Texas

landscape photo of Garner State Park, Texas
Shutterstock
  1. Black-Tailed Rattlesnake
  2. Copperhead
  3. Cottonmouth
  4. Massasauga
  5. Mojave Rattlesnake
  6. Prairie Rattlesnake
  7. Pygmy Rattlesnake
  8. Rock Rattlesnake
  9. Timber Rattlesnake
  10. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Texas has the second-highest number of native snake species of all U.S. states.

Utah

a field of pink, orange, and purple wildflowers and mountains in Alta, Utah
Shutterstock
  1. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  2. Midget Faded Western Rattlesnake
  3. Mojave Rattlesnake
  4. Prairie Rattlesnake
  5. Sidewinder
  6. Speckled Rattlesnake
  7. Timber Rattlesnake

Vermont

red farmhouses, orange trees, and rural land in Reading, Vermont at sunrise
Shutterstock
  1. Timber Rattlesnake

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Virginia

landscape photo of Buchanan, Virginia
Shutterstock
  1. Copperhead
  2. Cottonmouth
  3. Timber Rattlesnake

Washington

landscape photo of mountains and flowers at Mt. Rainier in Seattle, Washington
iStock
  1. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
  2. Prairie Rattlesnake

West Virginia

cranberry glades west virginia state natural wonders
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  1. Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Wisconsin

sunflower field
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  1. Massasauga
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Wyoming

sunset in the rural town of buffalo wyoming
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  1. Midget Faded Western Rattlesnake
  2. Prairie Rattlesnake
Dana Schulz
Dana Schulz is the Deputy Lifestyle Editor at Best Life. She was previously the managing editor of 6sqft, where she oversaw all content related to real estate, apartment living, and the best local things to do. Read more
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