If You Live in These States, Prepare to See More Tarantulas

Experts say the furry spiders are actively mating in multiple U.S. states this summer.

For many arachnophobes, the mere thought of a daddy long legs dropping down from the ceiling is enough to break them out in a cold sweat. And for those who find the idea of encountering even a small spider bone-chilling, the thought of getting up close and personal with a tarantula is enough to send them running for the hills. Unfortunately, this summer may be a particularly bad time to number among the eight-leg-averse, as numerous states are about to see an influx of tarantulas this season.

In an interview with ValleyCentral.com, Christopher Vitek, PhD, an associate professor of biology at The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, confirmed that tarantulas, 50 species of which are native to the U.S., are currently in their mating season.

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During the spiders' mating season, which runs from March to October, you may be more likely to encounter a tarantula—and you'd be wise to leave them alone if you do. While they are venomous, Vitek explains that tarantula venom is typically weak, and that the pain from a tarantula's bite is generally the biggest concern if you are bitten by one—something that rarely happens unless the animal is provoked.

However, it's not just outdoors that you may encounter these sizable spiders this summer.

"Tarantulas are burrowing spiders, but during mating season or at night when they go hunting, they may end up inside your home," says Nancy Troyano, PhD, a board-certified entomologist with Western Exterminator, who recommends sealing any cracks or openings in the exterior of your home during tarantula mating season to keep them from coming inside. Troyano also notes that cluttered yards, stacks of boxes, and overgrown vegetation can all become safe havens for tarantulas in your yard or shed, as well.

If you want to avoid being spooked by one of these furry spiders, read on to discover which states are likely to see their tarantula population soar this summer.

RELATED: If You Live in These States, Report This Bug to Local Officials.

1
Arizona

cityscape photo of downtown Mesa, Arizona
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2
Arkansas

The skyline of Little Rock, Arkansas at dawn
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3
California

The skyline of Los Angeles, California at sunset.
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4
Colorado

skyline and mountains in Colorado Springs, Colorado at dusk
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5
Kansas

cityscape photo of downtown Wichita, Kansas at night
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6
Louisiana

street cars in New Orleans, Louisiana in the afternoon
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7
Missouri

cityscape photo of the historic columns and downtown Columbia, Missouri
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8
Nevada

The Strip of Las Vegas, Nevada at night
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9
New Mexico

cityscape photo of Santa Fe, New Mexico at dusk
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10
Oklahoma

cityscape photo of Tulsa, Oklahoma at dusk
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11
Texas

downtown Austin, Texas
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12
Utah

orange rocks and mountains in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah at sunrise
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RELATED: If You Live in These States, Don't Drive With Your Windows Down, Officials Warn.

 

 

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