Drone Video Shows 50 Foot Waves and 100 MPH Winds Inside Hurricane Fiona

This might be the strongest storm in Canadian history.

Hurricane Fiona landed on the Eastern Seaboard of Canada on Saturday morning, September 24, wreaking destruction on Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, and Prince Edward Island. "The situation right now is where none of us want us to be," says Nova Scotia Premier Tim Houston. "I dread to think of where we would be had Nova Scotians not taken every single possible precaution to protect themselves and their families." Drone footage taken over the ocean highlights just how dramatic and scary the waves and winds are. Here's what the video shows.

1
Gigantic, Terrifying Waves

NOAA/Saildrone

A drone sent by NOAA and Saildrone Inc. to gather data from the heart of Hurricane Fiona shows massive 50 ft waves and dramatic 100 mph winds. Fiona has left 470,000 people without power, in what is being called the strongest storm in Canadian history. "It's shocking the damage that we're seeing," Premier Houston says. "We're seeing devastating images come out of Port aux Basques," says Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. "PEI (Prince Edward Island) has experienced storm damage like they've never seen. Cape Breton is being hit hard, too, as is Quebec." Keep reading to learn more and see the video.

2
Total Devastation In Newfoundland

Damage to the Stanley Bridge Marina, including a boat knocked ashore from wind and storm surge, a day after Post-Tropical Storm Fiona hit the Atlantic coast n September 25, 2022 in New London, Prince Edward Island, Canada
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Southwestern Newfoundland has been ravaged by the storm, officials say, with close to 200 people so far being displaced and homes swept away. "What's actually happening here is total devastation," says Mayor Brian Button. "We are going to force people out of their homes if we need to. They need to go. I'm telling you, it is a mess out there. This has become bigger, and worse than we had imagined." 

3
Prince Edward Island

A tree sits against power lines and a home after Post-Tropical Storm Fiona hit on September 24, 2022 in Sydney, Nova Scotia on Cape Breton Island in Canada
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Nearly all of Prince Edward Island was without power on Saturday, and the military has been sent into help with cleanup. Authorities are warning people not to go near downed power lines. "Under no circumstances should residents attempt to clear trees or branches away from downed power lines," according to a news release issued by the City of Charlottetown. "If it is safe to do so, please place manageably sized debris in piles on the side of the road and away from sidewalks. This will help city crews during the lengthy clean up process ahead."

4
Historical Disaster

A vehicle navigates around downed trees laying against power lines a day after Post-Tropical Storm Fiona
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Many locals are saying this is by far the worst storm they have ever experienced. "I have seen wind that has pulled trees out of the ground, homes swept away by water, homes that have been lost to the ocean," says Rene Roy, 50, editor-in-chief of the Wreckhouse Press newspaper in Newfoundland. "I've seen a boat in the middle of a playground. Cabins and swing sets floating by. It is surreal what is happening here." 

5
Stay Home

Vehicles navigate around a downed tree from Post-Tropical Storm Fiona.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Authorities are warning people to stay home for safety. "We ask people to stay home unless absolutely necessary," says Charlottetown, PEI police Chief Brad MacConnell. "Stay home unless you absolutely need to go somewhere, like a reception center or a place in need. Now is not the time to be curious about what's going on in our community, now is not the time to be reckless in your actions by exposing yourself to danger … and now is not the time to be selfish when it comes to those things. I don't think people fully appreciate the danger that's out in the community right now. It's amazing the difference of a day in the weather but the challenges of Fiona are still with us and we're working through them."

Ferozan Mast
Ferozan Mast is a science, health and wellness writer with a passion for making science and research-backed information accessible to a general audience. Read more
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