The CDC Just Warned of 3 New Vaccine Side Effects

It's more than just a sore arm you could be dealing with after your inoculation, the agency says.

The three COVID vaccines currently approved for use in the U.S.—from Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson—are providing some much-needed hope about getting the pandemic under control after a long and difficult year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 85 million vaccine doses have been administered in the U.S. thus far, as of March 5, a number that will continue to rise as more people become eligible to receive theirs. However, as more people get the vaccine, health experts are learning more about its potential side effects. That's why the CDC has just updated its list of COVID vaccine side effects, adding three conditions to watch out for after you receive your shot or shots. Read on to discover which side effects the CDC just added to their post-vaccination guidance. And if you want to ensure you're getting the best protection possible, Doctors Say Do These 2 Things the Morning of Your Vaccine Appointment.

1
Muscle pain

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On March 5, the CDC updated its vaccine guidance to include muscle pain as a potential side effect of the COVID vaccine. According to the CDC, this is a distinct symptom from the pain you may experience in the arm you got your shot in. And for the latest COVID news delivered straight to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter.

2
Nausea

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You might want to spring for a few saltines after your vaccine, now that the CDC's latest update has identified nausea as a potential COVID vaccine side effect. And if you're curious about the newest vaccine, check out These Are the Side Effects of the New Johnson & Johnson Vaccine, FDA Says.

3
Redness at the injection site

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As part of the agency's March 5 update to their post-vaccine guidance, the CDC identified redness at the injection site as another new side effect to look out for after you get your shot. In rare cases, this side effect may even show up significantly after you receive your inoculation. According to a March 3 letter published by The New England Journal of Medicine, some individuals have experienced a large, red, itchy, and painful reaction at their vaccination site up to 11 days after receiving the Moderna vaccine.

4
Pain and swelling at the injection site

man with upper arm pain after vaccine
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It's not just redness you should watch out for. You may also experience pain and swelling in the arm you received your vaccine in, the CDC says. If this symptom worsens after 24 hours, the agency recommends contacting your doctor for advice. And for more situations in which you should talk to your MD, check out The CDC Says Don't Take This After Your Vaccine Without a Doctor's OK.

5
Fever

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While the CDC emphasizes that the mRNA COVID vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer do not contain live viral material, and thus have no potential to infect you with COVID, you can have side effects similar to COVID symptoms after receiving your vaccine, like a fever. The CDC recommends drinking plenty of fluids and dressing lightly to help mitigate these effects.

6
Chills

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Similarly, you may experience chills after receiving your vaccine, whether or not you've actually developed a fever. And for more vaccine guidance to follow, check out The CDC Says Don't Do This Within 2 Weeks of Your COVID Vaccine.

7
Tiredness

A tired man adjusts his face mask while outdoors during the COVID-19 crises.
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If you're feeling tired after getting your vaccine, you're not alone—and getting a little extra shut-eye before your vaccine is also a good idea. According to a Jan. 2021 paper published in Psychological Perspectives, getting a good night's sleep in the 24 hours before your vaccination may actually help boost your immune response.

8
Headache

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That headache you have after getting your shot may be an unfortunate side effect of your COVID vaccine. Fortunately, the CDC says that it likely won't last long. "Side effects may feel like flu and even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days," the agency explains. And for a tip on what to stay away from post-vaccine, check out Don't Do This Until a Month After Your COVID Vaccine, Experts Warn.

Sarah Crow
Sarah Crow is a senior editor at Eat This, Not That!, where she focuses on celebrity news and health coverage. Read more
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