If You Live Here, Prepare to See More Wasps This Summer, Experts Warn

Fifteen states may be subjected to more of these "massive" wasps in the coming months.

While bees, wasps, and hornets of all kinds tend to make an appearance each summer, you may see even more this year. With the Brood X cicadas emerging in 15 states for the first time in 17 years, a host of unwelcome critters are making appearances to gobble on the crunchy bugs. The trillions of cicadas are expected to draw out more wasps referred to as "cicada killers" as they feast on their food source of choice.

Cicada killer wasps look similar to murder hornets but are more "mild-mannered," explains certified entomologist Natasha Wright. These wasps emerge from underground in the summer to feed on cicadas and begin to die off in the fall. While they are generally not aggressive, they do sting when bothered, and "their massive size would amount to a massive puncture wound," says Wright.

But the real damage these wasps are likely to create is in your yard. The cicada killer wasps dig long, messy burrows in the ground. To try to keep them from messing up your grass, Wright suggests overseeding and watering any bare patches to encourage grass and vegetation growth, which will make the area less desirable to the wasps for nesting.

RELATED: For more up-to-date information, sign up for our daily newsletter.

"As one of the biggest groups of periodical cicadas, Brood X is definitely where we see a lot of cicada killers," says Andrew Harris, pest control service supervisor at AccuRat Pest Solutions in the U.K. While there won't technically be more cicada killers buzzing around, you may spot more of them nearby since far more cicadas than usual will be scattered about for the taking.

Entomologist Ryan Smith, a pest control expert in Oregon, says as Brood X starts "to emerge in certain states, we can spot more cicada killers than usual." He explains that "they feast on emerging cicadas, with female cicada killers stinging cicadas to death. After mating, male cicada killers die, while females remain active for a month or two."

To see if you're in one of the 15 states that could see a rise in cicadas and cicada killer wasps, read on.

RELATED: If You Live Here, Prepare for a Mosquito Invasion Like You've Never Seen.

1
Delaware

cityscape photo of Wilmington, Delaware
Shutterstock

2
Georgia

shops and road in Americus, Georgia
iStock

3
Illinois

cityscape of houses and shops downtown Galena, Illinois
Shutterstock

4
Indiana

Indiana
Shutterstock

5
Kentucky

landscape photo of Frankfort, Kentucky at sunrise
Shutterstock

6
Maryland

Deep Creek Lake, Maryland
Shutterstock

7
Michigan

downtown Detroit Michigan
f11photo / Shutterstock

8
New Jersey

New Jersey
Shutterstock

9
New York

Rochester New York
Shutterstock

10
North Carolina

tree, road in raleigh, north carolina in summer
Von Sharkshock / Shutterstock

11
Ohio

cityscape photo of Roebling Suspension Bridge in and skyline of Cincinnati, Ohio
iStock

12
Pennsylvania

landscape photo of Forest County, Pennsylvania
Shutterstock

13
Tennessee

The skyline of Chattanooga, Tennessee
iStock

14
Virginia

The downtown skyline of Richmond, Virginia just after sunrise
iStock

15
West Virginia

city skyline and river in downtown Charleston, West Virginia at dusk
Shutterstock

RELATED: 5 Things You're Buying That Bring Bed Bugs Into Your House, Experts Say.

Allie Hogan
Allie Hogan is a Brooklyn based writer currently working on her first novel. Read more
Filed Under